Loading 00001hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…

[Video Tuần này xem ảnh của ai?] Photos that look like that are not like that of Hiroshi Sugimoto


If you look at the pictures below, perhaps you see that they are nothing too special, just the wild animals in the middle of the mountain forest nature. But if you know more information they are not real, just stuffed dolls, you will be very surprised. Artist Hiroshi Sugimoto has ingeniously captured the series of visual misleading viewers, which makes us admire.






Loading 00002hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…

When Sugimoto arrived in New York in 1974, the streets were filled with eye-catching themes: colorful graffiti walls, residents frightened by rising crime rates, or Manhattan filled with lavish things. people cannot reach. He had intended to record these events, but on his visit to the American Museum of Natural History, the plan completely changed to another direction – an inspiration that would last until later.

There, he was mesmerized by the staged scenes in the glass cage: a group of lions eating the zebra and leaving the vultures and hyenas lurking nearby. He saw the similarities between this scene and the new Manhattan city and thought: "Wow, this is New York." "I suddenly realized that if I closed one eye I would have a photographic view. The camera has only one lens, it is equivalent to one eye. So if you close one eye, you will lose." a sense of depth and a better sense of reality. "



Loading 00003hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Loading 00004hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…

He began to record this staging scene with the 35mm camera he was carrying to realize that he needed to use a different technique to make the animals look more realistic. And before returning to the museum for a second time, he bought a very complex 8×10 large format camera that was technically invented in the 19th century and is not used by many contemporary photographers. This type of camera allowed him to record more details for later prints.

Sugimoto knows he can't take stuffed animals from inside the glass frame and to eliminate the reflection from these glasses, he covers a camera with black cloth and exposes it, sometimes he Exposure to an hour. He then made his own home-made film, using a formula developed by 20th-century photographer Ansel Adams to give better results than outside commercial darkrooms.



Loading 00005hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Loading 00006hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Loading 00007hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…

In the end, the photographer decided to take the "Dioramas" and all subsequent series in black and white. According to him, black and white is capable of deceiving viewers' eyes compared to color images.

In an era when Photoshop is heavily edited and manipulated, Hiroshi Sugimoto's work blurs the boundaries between what is real and what is unreal as a reminder to us, that tells us even when things are in our eyes, we don't have to trust them completely. He mastered the craft, crafted and used techniques of the 19th century but was still a contemporary artist and concept in his work, causing viewers to question the perception of yourself before everything.

"If you believe these scenes are real, your eyes are definitely in trouble." – He warned the viewer.



Loading 00008hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-viewing-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Loading 00009hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Loading 00010hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Loading 00011hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Downloading 00012hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Loading 00013hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Loading 00014hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…



Loading 00015hiroshi-sugimoto-tuan-nay-see-anh-ai-camera-tinhte.jpg…

Please watch the video to better understand how Hiroshi Sugimoto works with his 8×10 camera :)



trangminhhoang93@gmail.com (blueJune)

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *