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Try eGPU performance and end: Buying eGPU for making movies makes it much slower


-> eGPU is a product that can be said to make quite a lot of people “crave” when thinking about, instead of spending a large amount of money to upgrade a computer, you can easily upgrade the performance of Old machine with a “less” amount. So in fact, does eGPU really upgrade the performance of the brother machine?

The answer is YES and NO

Invite you to watch the video:

Why yes and no? It is up to you to use the eGPU for what purpose? Today’s article aims to answer some of your questions before “embarking” on the road to buy eGPU.

First, I’ll use my case to do the test I’m using


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  • Macbook Pro 16 “, CPU 2.3 GHz 8-Core Intel Core i9, 16GB 2667 MHz DDR4, AMD Radeon Pro 5500M 4 GB


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  • The eGPU I use is NodePro and Radeon RX Vega 64 Gaming OC version 8GB RAM HBM2

EGPU tests will be performed


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  • Try Final Cut Pro performance with BruceX
  • Try Final Cut Pro performance by exporting 5 minutes of 4K movies
  • Try 30s movie shake reduction with Apple Motion
  • Try exporting 50 Nikon Z6 raw images with Lightroom to Jpeg
  • Try rendering your donut with Blender
  • Try running Unigine Heaven Benchmark

(Each test I do 3 times and average the time)

Explain the test:

  • The BruceX test and 4K movie production is to test the performance when running Final Cut Pro X, the Motion image stabilization test is also part of the movie performance test, the reason is because many people will intend to buy eGPU to increase Performance for Final Cut Pro X
  • Try exporting images with Lightroom to see if using eGPU is more effective than image editing
  • Try Unigine Heaven Benchmark is to try and play better game.

A. Test the performance of Final Cut Pro X with the Macbook Pro + eGPU with the BruceX test:

What is BruceX? As a Final Cut Pro X XML file provided by Alex4D, you download the file and import it into Final Cut Pro. It will create a short timeline at 5120 x 2700 resolution (23,975 fps). It will use the standard Final Cut generators, titles and transitions with complex layers with lots of content, it will need lots of RAM RAM to work.

The Bruce X test is a measure of how long it takes your Mac to export this project.

How to try BruceX according to Alex4D
1. Turn on QuickTime Player and Final Cut Pro X

2. In Final Cut Pro X, go to settings, place Play Back, remember to turn off “Background render”


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3. Use the Import command ‘File: Import: XML…’ to import ‘BruceX Test – 5K.fcpxml’, it will create a short but very complicated 5K project

4. Click on the ‘BruceX Test – 5K‘ timeline then press the Share button

5. Export your movie to Quicktime, click “File: Share: Master File …”

6. In the new panel that appears, click Settings, where Video Codec select an “ProRes” option


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7. When When Done, select “Open with QuickTime Player”


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Click Next, choose where to save the output file, so choose your fastest drive if you want to export to an external drive, otherwise just export the SSD inside the machine.

Use the stopwatch and measure the time from when you press “Save” until the movie appears in the QuickTime player

You can measure 3 times and take the average, after each exit memory file exit and restart Final Cut Pro X to clear the rendering render.

B. And Following is the Benchmark result of Macbook Pro with eGPU and without eGPU with tests:

With the BruceX Final Cut Pro Benchmark test, we try over time, and the lower is better:


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The results showed that when BruceX was not used, it took 15 seconds for eGPU to export, and 23 seconds for eGPU to use.

Try exporting a 5-minute 4K movie clip with Final Cut Pro X


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The results showed that no eGPU took 2 minutes and 30 seconds, using eGPU took 6 minutes and 20 seconds

Conclude: Using eGPU for exporting movies, editing movies with Final Cut Pro X reduces the machine performance

Try 30-second stabilization for movies with Apple Motion


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The results showed that it took 82 seconds not to use eGPU, 32 seconds to use eGPU

Conclude: Using eGPU with Apple Motion is faster than not using eGPU

Try exporting 50 raw images taken with Nikon Z6 to JPEG, maximum resolution


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The results showed that it took 4 minutes and 20 seconds to not use eGPU, and 4 minutes to 20 seconds to use eGPU

Conclude: Using eGPU to process images with Lightroom has no performance changes

Try rendering donuts with Blender


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The results showed that no eGPU took 1 minute 16 seconds, using eGPU took 35 seconds


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This is a picture of a donut I made from a to z using Blender

Conclude: Use eGPU to handle 3D graphics with increased performance

Benchmark with Unigine Heaven


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The results showed that no eGPU achieved 52fps, while using eGPU achieved 78fps

Conclusion: Using eGPU to play games has increased performance

General conclusions about trying eGPU performance with Macbook Pro:

  • Using eGPU to process movies, making movies with Final Cut Pro does not increase the performance, sometimes it reduces the performance if your computer is a relatively new machine and the video card in the machine is also relatively strong.
  • Using eGPU to process images with Lightroom has no performance changes
  • Using eGPU to build 3D with Blender helps to increase rendering performance
  • Note that the test result is that the MacBook Pro 16 “configuration is quite strong, if you use the weaker machines, there may be improved performance when making movies with eGPU.

Try to explain why using eGPU makes movies so slow:

In my opinion, when you import movies into Final Cut Pro (or Premier), these software extract the project very large, when you render the movie, a huge amount of data is transferred back and forth between the computer and the eGPU. with Thunderbolt 3 cable clog and slow.

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For example, the project I made here (the video at the beginning of the article) is just a movie of more than 5 minutes but in Final Cut Pro, the size is nearly 110GB already, this large amount of data is transmitted by the computer via eGPU to process. and then transfer it back to your computer to write into a 1.2GB file, so it takes a long time.

Of course this is just a personal explanation of themselves, and online, they simply say “traffic congestion” and all that.


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So you have the answer, you will decide to buy eGPU or not to buy eGPU?

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[email protected] (Nam Air)

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