To present a new product launch as effectively as Apple


Presenting in public is not easy, and presentations introducing new products are no exception. Perhaps that is why most presentations are often “very terrible”.

You’ve even been to meetings, conferences, or events where the person on stage gets paid a lot of money, perhaps because they have the ability to string a few words into a sentence that is supposed to change lives. friend. Yet what you think of is whether you can handle that “torture” even for a few minutes. If we talk about the effectiveness of a new product launch presentation, we can learn a lot from Apple.

Keynote sessions are always expected from Apple

The brand regularly presents new product launches and does it better than anyone else, if not “much better.” Here are five things we can refer to from Apple’s new product presentation.

Make the audience feel the story

Apple product introductions always start with a story. Sometimes it’s a 2-minute video of abstract photos of the product. Sometimes it’s a short line or two to connect the audience with Apple’s core mission.

The story helps bring people together, and it’s a solid starting point for brands to start displaying the products they want people to buy.

The story helps bring people together, and it’s a solid starting point for brands to start displaying the products they want people to buy. For example, Apple began giving a speech at the Worldwide Developers Conference with a video about the hard work of developers. Audiences know exactly how the characters feel in the video and now they know that Apple understands that, too. The story helps bring people together, and it’s a solid starting point for brands to start displaying the products they want people to buy.

Believe and act as if the audience will like the product

“We think I will really like it” (We think I was going to really love it) is a common saying in Tim Cook’s product presentations. Each time he said that, the CEO made assumptions about his audience and made them expect that what he was about to say would bring them joy. He acted as if it were true, that the customer would love this product.

Tim Cook – He is the successor of Apple’s CEO position after Steve Jobs Photo: The Guardian

No good presenters try to convince you that you “should” like them but act as if you already liked it. This is really one of the most effective ways to communicate with people. Instead of telling people why they should care, just act as if they were interested. They wouldn’t be there if they didn’t care, right?

Show products in real life

If you look at Apple’s presentation at the Worldwide Developers Conference, you’ll find that while you’re talking about new products, the presentation spends a lot of time talking about “features.”

This is a specialized conference for developers, and you might expect a demonstration of the feature. But instead, Apple illustrates “how this product will make your life better”. That is a big difference.

Instead of showing aspects of the new device or software, Apple shows audiences how to do what they will love to do with this new product. With this presentation, Apple makes the product “more real”, which creates an emotional connection with the “feature” the brand is talking about.

Practice

Public speaking is a performance art and performance art requires practice. The speech only naturally attracts it if it is ingrained in the presenter’s memory and they can speak without thinking about it. Therefore, read the script carefully and practice it smoothly.

People who are naturally charismatic are often tempted with the idea of ​​”juggling without preparation” because they believe it will look more natural. That’s only true if you understand nature means awkward.

Details are important

After all, details like lighting, music and especially the background of the presentation pages will make a difference.

No one is standing on stage to read “slides” one after another

What really makes the difference is that all of these details are not designed to draw attention to the presentation, but are actually designed to support the presentation. No one is standing on stage to read one “slide” after another (to be honest), most likely you’ve ever created or viewed a similar content before). “Slides” are just what the audience expected to appear on the screen and reinforce the “feeling” of the event.

Mai Quynh / Inc
* Source: Businessman +

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