The second time Japanese probes responded to an asteroid, sending precious film footage to Earth - Photo 1.

The second time Japanese probes responded to an asteroid, sending precious film footage to Earth


Japan's Hayabusa2 expedition mission is one of the 'difficult to' quests to learn about Ryugu asteroid. Recently, scientists have even gone one step further when deciding to land on the surface of the planet for the second time. It all happened as planned, and we had new footage.

The Hayabusa2 mission takes place in 5 steps:

– Fly and explore Ryugu asteroids

– Down to find out about the face

– Use 'space gun' to create a dent

– Take down the 2nd time to get the specimen

– Fly back to Earth and finish the mission

The second time Japanese probes responded to an asteroid, sending precious film footage to Earth - Photo 2.

According to JAXA, the company has launched the ship, reaching the 4th step is now a difficult job and may fail. However, they calculated all the cases, and decided to land it down to get precious images and specimens.

The second time Japanese probes responded to an asteroid, sending precious film footage to Earth - Photo 3.

In the previous mission, the ship had taken samples from the asteroid surface, but in order to carry out the new task it had to fire a heavy copper bullet to 2-kilograms at a speed of 4400 miles per hour to obtain the things deep underground. This is one of the resounding victories for humans, helping us to understand the ingredients hidden under the stone, something that ships and robots previously could not do.

The second time Japanese probes responded to an asteroid, sending precious film footage to Earth - Photo 4.

The photo shows scientists celebrating when the ship landed on the surface

In a press conference, JAXA published a short video consisting of 4 seconds ago, 4 seconds after the ship landed on the surface. The ship only touches the surface to collect the specimen, then flies up and not respond too long. In the near future, this company will announce more of its discoveries thanks to the Hayabusa2 mission.


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