The first photograph captures the phenomenon of quantum entanglement, which Einstein once called the ghost effect - Photo 1.

The first picture captured the phenomenon of quantum entanglement, what Einstein once called "spooky impact".


For the first time in history, physicists have taken a picture that demonstrates the existence of quantum entanglement – one of the most famous and interesting phenomena occurring in the microscopic world.

That's what Albert Einstein once called "Spooky hành động tại một distance"temporarily translated"spooky effects from afar ". Simply put, this method allows two objects at any distance to interact and influence immediately to each other.

Although they are only a few meters apart or a few light years apart, interactions occur immediately. It is counterintuitive in the classical mechanical world. But then we will have to nod when we look and read the explanation of this photograph taken by physicists from Glasgow University, Scotland.

It is the next evidence to show that quantum entanglement and ghost effects are real. These phenomena can become the foundation for many new technologies, including quantum computers, telecommunications and quantum internet …

The first photograph captures the phenomenon of quantum entanglement, which Einstein calls "spooky impact".

Quantum entanglement occurs when two particles at any distance still have close ties. What happens to one particle here, immediately affects the other even though their distance can reach light years, even across the black hole.

Eisntein called this influence "Ghost effects"He did not believe in the theory, rejecting the notion that the universe could behave in such a strange and random way."God does not play dice", that is Eisntein's saying that makes quantum entanglement famous, challenging other scientists to find evidence for its existence and"Ghost effects".

Taking the challenge, many scientists have done a lot of research to eliminate Einstein's doubts. In 1964, Northern Irish physicist John Stewart Bell stated Bell's theorem named after him, showing the difference between the quantum and classical mechanics in quantum entanglement.

The first photograph captures the phenomenon of quantum entanglement, which Einstein once called the ghost effect - Photo 2.

Is the ghost effect real or not?

By 1982, a group of physicists were able to prove "tGhostly ghosts"in mathematics. In 2015, a first experiment confirmed the existence of quantum entanglement.

And this year, a photograph of what happens between two quantum entangled photons continues to prove that they can interact and share physical states with each other in moments.

Paul-Antoine Moreau, the lead author of the study, told the BBC that this image was "An elegant illustration of a basic attribute of nature".

To capture this incredible image, Moreau and a group of physicists have created a system that blows out the photon streams entangled together in what they describe as'objects are not normal.

As a result, they captured 4 images of photons under 4 different phase transitions. You can see the full image below:

The first photograph captures the phenomenon of quantum entanglement, which Einstein once called the ghost effect - Photo 3.

Image of quantum entangled photons

The last image you see is the stacking of many 4 photon shots as they undergo a series of phase transition states. Physicists separate pairs of quantum entangled photons and release one of the two beams through the liquid crystal β-barium borate, activating four transition phases.

In this process, they captured photographs of photons that did not pass through the crystal material, indicating that when entangled with the remaining photons, these photons also experienced phase transitions.

Below is a description of the layout of the experiment: Light beams containing entangled photons are launched from the lower left corner. After passing a half-reflector, half of the photon will turn left, passing through 4 phase filters. The remaining photons in the pair of self-transducers pass through the mirror, going straight to the sensor without going through the filter.

What is special is that the image taken by the camera at the same moment shows that all photons in both directions experience phase changes. In other words, they have been entangled with quantum.

The first photograph captures the phenomenon of quantum entanglement, which Einstein once called the ghost effect - Photo 4.

Returning to Bell's theorem describes the difference between the quantum world and classical mechanics, there is an inequality in which if you break it, you will record quantum entanglement.

"Here, we report an experiment proving the violation of Bell inequality in observed images", the research team wrote in Science Advances magazine."This result will pave the way for new quantum world photography plans … and a promise for plans to develop quantum information based on space variables.".

The study is published in Science Advances magazine.

Refer Sciencealert


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