The Pornhub site, for example, allows users to upload videos themselves, making it possible to stream a video without the consent of the people being filmed there.  Source: ISTOCK

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The Pornhub site, for example, allows users to upload videos themselves, making it possible to stream a video without the consent of the people being filmed there. Source: ISTOCK

An international law firm has filed a lawsuit in the United States against the company MindGeek for alleged sexual exploitation videos allegedly on Pornhub, one of its websites.

Brown Rudnick LLP said the lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, was on behalf of 30 victims of child pornography, rape and human trafficking who the lawsuit claims were exploited on the Pornhub site.

The cabinet is seeking damages for the effect of exploitation against the alleged victims and claims to have zero tolerance for illegal content.

None of Brown Rudnick LLP’s charges have been proven in court.

In a statement, Pornhub said it was reviewing the lawsuit. The company said it takes all complaints about its website seriously, including the lawsuit against Brown Rudnick LLP.

Pornhub added that it now has strict measures in place, including banning downloads from unverified users.

MindGeek is already under investigation by a Canadian federal privacy watchdog.

The Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien said his office was investigating the company following testimony from women who said Pornhub rejected their requests to take down videos.

Pornhub claims 130 million visitors every day.  Source: Radio-Canada

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Pornhub claims 130 million visitors every day. Source: Radio-Canada

Parliamentarians in Ottawa want to tighten the screw on porn sites

Meanwhile, a parliamentary committee in Ottawa recommends that Canadians who are victims of posting an image or video online without their consent on sites like Pornhub have the right to demand that that content be removed. at once.

In a report released Thursday, the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics also recommends that online platforms, such as that of Montreal-based MindGeek, be held accountable for n ” failing to prevent the uploading of child sexual exploitation material, content showing non-consensual activity or uploaded without the knowledge of all parties.

The committee also recommends that online platforms be held accountable for failing to ensure that material is removed promptly, or face financial penalties. MEPs also want measures to be put in place to verify that the people represented in pornographic content are of legal age and have consented to publication.

In addition, the committee advises the federal government to create a legal framework to require Internet service providers that host pornographic content to become more proactive in moderating content and enforcing the rules – and to be held legally responsible for it.

MindGeek Chairman and CEO Feras Antoon.  Source: Radio-Canada

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MindGeek Chairman and CEO Feras Antoon. Source: Radio-Canada

The opposition in expectation

Conservative MP Shannon Stubbs, a committee member, said the recommendations were made with a sense of “urgency, determination and set expectations” and that it was now up to the government to act on this file.

Last February, before the same committee, the CEO of MindGeek, Feras Antoon, and the COO, David Tassillo, ensured that all website content was reviewed using multiple software tools before being approved by human moderators.

“We always ask all of our agents to be cautious: if you have any doubts, don’t let it be posted online,” Tassillo told the committee on February 5.

In April, the Liberal government announced it would introduce legislation to create a new regulator that would ensure online platforms remove harmful content, including depictions of children and intimate images shared without consent.