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Halloween in China: People enjoy, boycott


"My child is afraid of ghosts so I dressed him up as a Chinese swordsman," said Wang Guyue.
On this occasion every year, the English center in Shanghai – where Wang's son goes to study – is decorated in the theme of the Western Halloween festival. All children wear special costumes, makeup and organize candy games.

A man who turns into a devil attends a Halloween festival in Beijing. Photo: Reuters

Because this is an English school, Ms. Wang thinks it is reasonable to organize Western festivals. Children can learn more about culture and new vocabulary. She said the teacher explained Hallowwen's day to the students, but with limited language skills, the children would not understand everything.

The South China Morning Post (SCMP) reported that for many young people in China, in October, it is indispensable for Halloween activities such as masquerade. Countless amusement parks and pubs have invested in decorating since the beginning of the month.

Even so, this wave of protest against holidays originating in the West is still boiling every year. Many people think that dressing like a devil is a "bad omen". Some train stations also prohibit passengers from wearing Halloween costumes.

In Shenzhen, parks like "Window of the World" and "Happy Valley" both host parade activities, shows and haunted houses that follow the devil festival from October to early November. Guests are encouraged to dress up. Clips on social media show creepy ghost houses with fluttering lights, full of human bones and cobwebs. Staff is disguised as a devil, rushing out to scare visitors.

Miko, who lives in Shenzhen, said she went to the local Woodpecker restaurant last weekend and dressed up as Joker – a villain in the "Batman" series. "We sat together in the face of dressing, enjoying the food, no need to be too special," Mike said.

However, many people playing Halloween may have to control their behavior in public because Guangzhou police issued an announcement on the evening of October 30, banning masquerade or scary makeup to the train station. electricity.

“As Western Halloween approaches, entertainment shops and agencies often organize celebrations. Passengers dressed in strange costumes and makeup appeared at the train stations in big cities, including Guangzhou, causing curious people to observe and even frighten other passengers. ” , notice on writing.

Terminal staff will prevent such behavior. Those who do not comply and create riots in public places will be handled according to law. Last week, some passengers in Guangzhou had to wipe the makeup off to get on board. (See video below. Source: SCMP)

In addition, social media and forums in China each year argue over whether Western festivals like Halloween and Christmas are too prominent, overwhelming traditional festivals.

“I object to Halloween. It shows that we are neither confident in our culture nor blindly passionate about eating British or American food. I don't think this is a way to educate children, ”a netizen wrote on Weibo.

Other netizens thought that disguising as a devil was a bad omen. China's Qingming Day commemorates ancestors, burns votive objects, and visits graves, rather than organizing parties or costumes.

In the past, there were many requests in China to ban Western festivals. Last year, officials in the town of Langfang in Hebei Province posted a notice on social media asking people to dismantle all Christmas decorations and ban shops from selling related items.

As for Wang Guyue, she felt that her son was merely learning about other cultures and having fun while studying. The Chinese teachers of her children are guaranteed to help him learn the values ​​and traditions of the country.

For many others, enjoying the Halloween atmosphere is a way to get rid of the pressure after work. “People just take advantage of this opportunity, use Halloween as an excuse to gather and have fun together. No need to think too hard, ”Miko said.


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