Close-up of the intricate beauty of crystals passing through the world's highest-resolution snowflake camera for 3 minutes to read

Close-up of the intricate beauty of crystals passing through the world’s highest-resolution snowflake camera for 3 minutes to read


Nathan Myhrvold spent a year and a half crafting an incredibly complex camera to capture these snowflake images – arguably the highest resolution pictures of snowflakes ever taken.

Myhrvold was Microsoft’s chief technology officer until he retired in 1999 to pursue his other enduring passions – science, cooking, and photography. in fact, while working at microsoft, Myhrvold quit her job to get a cook’s degree from the École Deisine La Varenne in France.

After the establishment of a modernist culinary innovation laboratory, Myhrvold Since then has been the author of several cookbooks with photography an indispensable element in every publication. Over the years, Myhrvold and his team developed innovative photography techniques and crafted custom gear to capture food in new, unexpected ways – such as close-ups of cooking equipment and supermacro close-ups with focus stacking technique.

Thanks to these experiences, Myhrvold has now developed a technique for photographing the crystalline structure of snowflakes with incredible clarity and detail. This technique involves using pulsed LEDs to reduce the heat, which they radiate themselves, and speed up the Myhrvold can capture images. In conjunction with this approach, he worked with a custom-built camera, which is the highest resolution camera for snowflakes in the world.

Nathan Myhrvold share: “Snowflakes are a great example of hidden beauty”. ‘Water’, something familiar to all of us, is quite alien when you look at it from different angles. The complex beauty of snowflakes stems from their crystal structure, which is a direct reflection of the microscopic aspects of the water molecule.

Translator: Nam Vu

Source: designboom

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