Gear Reviews Random

Blue Yeti X, a versatile microphone with good sound quality


A few months ago, Blue Microphone launched the Yeti X on the market, a more complete model than the famous Yeti microphone. Today, we come back to this high-end model.

WE love

  • Sound quality (for the price)
  • The multifunction button
  • The 11-segment RGB LED display
  • The very complete software part
  • Vintage design

We don’t like

  • Random availability
  • Micro-USB connection
  • Sensitivity to vibrations and shocks
  • Software settings that can be laborious

Verdict :

Placed between the Yeti, the historic spearhead of the brand, and the Yeti Pro, a more upscale model, the Yeti X from Blue takes the positive points of the most affordable model in the range while retrieving some characteristics of the model the more expensive. With the Yeti X, we therefore find the good recording quality, the four capture modes, the versatility and the very “vintage” design of the original model, but the manufacturer has added light indicators and a multifunction button. Podcasters, YouTubers and other streamers will appreciate its qualities, as well as the features authorized by the G Hub software and the Blue VO! CE interface. The support allowing it to be placed in front of you, however, remains very sensitive to vibrations and will require for some the acquisition of an anti-shock suspension.

plus

In 2018, Logitech bought the manufacturer of audio peripherals Blue Microphones, and with it its entire product portfolio, mainly headsets and microphones. The idea was to complete Logitech’s consumer offering with a renowned semi-professional and professional range ; the invoice for the Swiss manufacturer then amounted to some 100 million euros. Following this takeover, USB microphones from the Yeti range thus came to complete the existing offer of Logigtech, including the brands Astro Gaming, Jaybird or Ultimate Ears.

Blue Yeti X
Credit: Galaxie Media / Yannick Guerrini

Today we are interested in Blue Yeti X, big brother of the respectable Blue Yeti released in 2009. Priced at around 40 euros more expensive, the Yeti X clearly bears an air of resemblance to the original Yeti, but there are still many differences to note. thus, if the design is always “vintage” inspired, the grid loses its spherical side. More generally, the Yeti X is less “round” and significantly more angular than the Yeti.

Blue Yeti X
Credit: Galaxie Media / Yannick Guerrini

Unlike the Yeti, the Yeti X has a multifunction button surrounded by several RGB LEDs. With several successive presses on the same button, it is for example possible to adjust the gain of the microphone, to view the level of his voice, to adjust the main output level or the output volume of the headphones connected to the Yeti X, to mix the computer’s audio volume with that of the microphone for listening through headphones, or even simply to mute the microphone. The Logitech G Hub software allows it to finely configure the 11-segment display, the LED colors or the operating mode of the multifunction button.

Blue Yeti X
Credit: Galaxie Media / Yannick Guerrini

On the other side of the Yeti X, there is a button to switch between the different polar diagrams : cardioid, stereo, omnidirectional or even bidirectional. These settings are possible thanks to the presence of four 14 mm electrostatic capsules. Of course, it is also possible to select the polar digraph via the G Hub software.

A premium product

The audio characteristics of the Blue Yeti X clearly place this microphone in the high end market. It covers a frequency range from 20 Hz to 20 kHz, can work until 48 kHz/24-bit and works on both PC and Mac. The maximum sound pressure level (SPL) reaches 122 dB.

In use, the Yeti X offers a decent sound, rather clear, with pronounced highs but low frequencies all the same. The rendering is quite “radio” by default, but it is then possible to customize it in software. A windshield or an anti-pop filter may be necessary in order to limit the sensitivity to plosive consonants (the “p” and “b” for example).

Blue Yeti X
Credit: Galaxie Media / Yannick Guerrini

With dimensions of 11 x 12.2 x 28.9 cm, the Yeti X is rather heavy since it displays 1.28 kg on the scale, including the table stand. In return, the whole is rather solid and the fastening system is both robust and easy to use. Suffice to say that assembly / disassembly is extremely fast.

Note all the same that the table base has the unfortunate tendency of transmit all vibrations and shocks to the microphone, especially when typing on your keyboard. These extraneous noises can be significantly reduced via the G Hub software, but a shock-resistant suspension system similar to that of HyperX’s Quadcast would have been welcome. Unfortunately, this would have totally changed the design of the Yeti X …

Blue Yeti X
Credit: Galaxie Media / Yannick Guerrini

If it comes with a table stand, the Blue Yeti X also has a standard thread allowing it to be attached to a microphone stand with shock-proof suspension or to an articulated arm. Next to it, there is a headphone output in 3.5mm mini-jack format, with “almost real-time” monitoring function. The headphone amplifier displays a frequency response from 20 Hz to 20 kHz, an output power (RMS) of 72 mW per channel and a minimum impedance of 13 ohms (16 omhs typical), for a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 100 dB.

On the other side is the micro-USB connector for connecting the microphone to the computer. Note that the manufacturer has chosen to ignore USB-C, which some may find unfortunate.

Blue Yeti X
Credit: Galaxie Media / Yannick Guerrini

An extremely complete software part

Let’s finish with the software part, extremely complete. Yeti X is supported by G Hub software and the integrated Blue VO! CE interface. In other words, everything is configurable via this interface, from the color of the RGB LEDs to their behavior, including directional adjustment (even if the cardioid mode will probably be the only one really used).

On the microphone side, many effects and presets are available. It is thus possible to define high-pass filters, noise reduction, de-esser (to suppress hissing sounds in the high frequencies), noise-gate (to suppress sounds in the background), compressor (to reduce the range dynamic) or limiter. A voice equalizer, making it possible to reduce or boost certain frequencies, is even available. The same kind of settings are available for the headphone output.

Logitech G Hub
Credit: Galaxie Media / Yannick Guerrini
Logitech G Hub
Credit: Galaxie Media / Yannick Guerrini
Logitech G Hub
Credit: Galaxie Media / Yannick Guerrini

Finally, in addition to the few presets offered by default, it is possible to download other presets made available by the user community. Suffice to say that the settings are almost infinite, which could also prove to be as much an advantage as a disadvantage. Obtaining a “perfect” sound could indeed become a real headache as the settings are numerous!



Yannick Guerrini

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