Japan produces supercars with natural materials: light by a fifth of steel, but five times stronger than spider silk - Photo 1.

as light as 1/5 of steel but 5 times more supple, "more" than spider silk


Weighing only a fifth of the steel but five times stronger, cellulose nanofiber (CNF) nanofibre material will be a new car-making material. It is tough and strong enough to be light enough for cars to glide in the wind; When CNF is used in vehicle manufacturing, we will remove about 2,000 kg of carbon emissions from the life of a vehicle.

CNF is made primarily of wood that is broken up, crushed, and heated in chemicals to remove wood and hemicellulose; The end product is a concentrated, supple and recyclable material. In tests conducted last year, the scientists showed that CNF is even more supple than spider silk.

Japan produces supercars made of natural materials: light by a fifth of steel but five times stronger than spider silk - Photo 2.

New testing also shows that we can use CNF for industrial production. Pouring CNF into the mold, we will get complex shapes and then assemble and make models of many pieces, cars are easy to see. Japan's Ministry of Environment saw the potential of CNF, they want to produce cars that are both light and strong but reduce carbon emissions to the environment.

Kyoto University is the first place to embark on the completion of CNF car production project; they built a supercar with a chassis, the interior was made mostly from CNF. They call this the Nanocellulose Media, or NCV for short, with about 10% less mass than traditional vehicles.

Japan produces supercars made of natural materials: light as 1/5 of steel but five times stronger than spider silk - Photo 3.

The research team is continuing to test the durability of the NCV, to make sure the super car made from nature can withstand rain, impact. The initial results brought good news, which made many carmakers (including Japanese automaker Toyota) keep an eye on. If mass production is cheap, this will be the evolution of the auto industry.

Refer to New Atlas


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