10 fascinating facts about Ansel Adams, pioneer photographer and environmentalist

10 fascinating facts about Ansel Adams, pioneer photographer and environmentalist



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Photo: © ️ Alan Ross Photography

Ansel Adams is an American photographer who became known for his impressive shots of the American West. His breathtaking black and white photographs have helped promote nature conservation and make photography a recognized and respected art form.

Here are 10 interesting facts about Ansel Adams life and career.


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Photo: Photo: © ️ Alan Ross

YOUR NATURE LOVE STARTED IN THE BAD.

Adams was born on February 20, 1902 in San Francisco, California. He grew up in the intersection of San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean before the famous Golden Gate Bridge (aka Kim Mon) was built and connected the two regions. Back then, the landscape was unspoiled, and Adams often wandered the trails and explored nature on his own.

HE HAS BEEN Wounded IN A LAND.

Ansel was only four years old when San Francisco suffered the great 1906 earthquake. During an aftershock, he lost his balance and fell directly against the garden wall resulting in a broken nose. The wound was so serious that it left behind for a long time.


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Lake Tenaya, Mount Conness, Yosemite National Park, California, 1946.

Photo: Ansel Adams. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

HE HAS CHANGED THE CAREER OF A POOR MUSIC ARTIST.

Adams began to teach himself how to read music and play the piano at the age of 12. By the age of 18, he decided to become a pianist, however, his plans changed after a visit. visited Yosemite National Park in 1916. During the 1920s, Adams’s frequent visits to the site sparked his interest in photography. “Yosemite’s splendor flared before us and it was brilliant,” he once wrote. “There is light everywhere. A new era has begun for me.” Using the Kodak Box Brownie camera, Adams focused on harnessing the light in each photo. He contributed quite a few photos to the Sierra Club newsletter and opened a solo exhibition in 1928. By 1930, he decided to become a full-time professional photographer.

HE SHOULD BE FAMOUSED BY GRANIT’S GONE MOUNTAIN PHOTO.

Adams’s first published catalog, Parmelian Prints of the High Sierras, marks a professional breakthrough and pays him a large commission. It includes his famous photo titled ‘Monolith, The Face of the Half Dome’. The photo depicts a huge granite peak in Yosemite as high as 1,500 miles above the valley. In April 1927, Adams climbed a cliff called the “Diving Board” to capture the photo.


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Merced River, Winter, Yosemite National Park, California, 1937.

Photo: Ansel Adams. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

He is a technical genius.

Many people believe that no other photographer of his era has known more about photography than Adams. He has written ten books on technical photography, and he even consulted Polaroid and Hasselblad on technical issues. Specialized knowledge and innovation have helped him form a distinct, striking style.

In 1927, Adams wanted to capture the “grandeur” of the Half Dome rock he encountered. He first shot the Half Dome with the K2 yellow filter but realized that the contrast wouldn’t give off a feeling of being impressed enough. However, the creative male photographer was determined to create an image that represented the grandeur that was exactly like his impression of the Half Dome that afternoon. Adams decided to use a dark red filter to turn a bright sky into a dark background, and tones captured that stunning spectacle perfectly.

It is NOT every time he shoots the landscape.

Although best known for his landscape photography, Adams also researched on other subjects. After the outbreak of World War II, Adams photographed a training camp at Manzanar, one of several Japanese-American detention centers. Adams donated the collection of more than 200 photographs to the Library of Congress in 1965. He wrote, “The purpose of my work is to show how people have suffered great injustice and loss. In terms of assets, the job goes through by building yourself a community of survival in a arid (but magnificent) environment … In short, I think this Manzanar Collection is a calendar document. important and I believe it can be used effectively. “


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Turn the Sequoias tree, Mariposa Forest, Yosemite National Park, California, 1950.

Photo: Ansel Adams. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

ONE of His Photographs HAS BEEN TAKED IN SPACE.

In 1941, Adams was asked to make murals of national parks and monuments to decorate the hall of the US Department of the Interior. One of the most acclaimed works from the collection is The Tetons and the Snake River, taken in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming in 1942. It also became one of the photographs taken by NASA and Carl. Sagan chose to take on the Voyager I and two spacecraft in 1977. They believe that landscape photographs will be ideal to demonstrate extraterrestrial life about the Earth’s environment.


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The Tetons and the Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, 1942.

Photo: Wikipedia

HE HAS BEEN A FREE CHARTER BONUS.

In 1980, President Jimmy Carter awarded Adams the highest honorary Medal of Freedom awarded to the common people. Through his artistry, Adams introduced the beauty of national parks to encourage nature conservation. Carter recognizes Adams’s environmental efforts and calls the photographer a “national organization”.


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Moon Up, Joshua National Park, California, 1948.

Photo: Ansel Adams. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

YOU ARE YOU WITH GEORGIA O’KEEFFE.

Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams first met in Taos, New Mexico in 1929 and maintained a lifelong friendship. At that time, she became a fairly famous artist while Adams was just starting her career. They stick together because of their mutual respect for nature and both are attracted to the landscape of the southwestern United States. To commemorate this friendship, the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, NM held an exhibition in 2009 titled Natural Affinities to show the works of both artists, side by side.

HE CAN’T PRINT ALL IMAGES.

Throughout his career, Adams has always developed and exposed pictures of himself in his own dark room. When he died of a heart attack in 1984 at the age of 82, he left behind an archive of more than 40,000 photos, many of which had never been printed because he simply did not have time. Managers discovered thousands of negative photos tucked away inside shoelaces, but they weren’t all black and white landscape photos – some in color and some even portraits.


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Cathedral Rock, Yosemite National Park, California, 1949.

Photo: Ansel Adams. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

Check out Ansel Adams’s inspirational work:


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Late afternoon, Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, 1943.

Photo: Ansel Adams. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.


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Lake Denali and Wonder, Denali National Park, Alaska, 1948.

Photo: Ansel Adams. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.


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Clearing Winter Storm, Yosemite National Park, California, 1937.

Photo: Ansel Adams. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.


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Dune, White Sands National Park, New Mexico State (USA), 1941.

Photo: Ansel Adams. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

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