05:30 Wrongly believe in China? U.S. deletes 241 virus gene sequence



The National Institutes of Health confirmed that after Chinese researchers submitted the Wuhan pneumonia gene sequencing data, they asked the National Health Institute to delete it.  (Taken from Wikipedia)

The National Institutes of Health confirmed that after Chinese researchers submitted the Wuhan pneumonia gene sequencing data, they asked the National Health Institute to delete it. (Taken from Wikipedia)

2021/06/25 05:30

Chinese researcher said “data update” requested deletion

[Compiled by Mao Yi/Comprehensive Report]The Wall Street Journal and other Western media reported on the 24th that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) requested a Chinese researcher last June to maintain the “serial access file” maintained by the institute. The online database (Sequence Read Archive, SRA) includes the deletion of viral gene sequences from hospitalized or suspected cases of Wuhan pneumonia collected in Wuhan, China between January and February last year. This move may make it more difficult for scientists to study the source of the epidemic.

The SRA database is managed by the National Library of Medicine. Dr. Jesse Bloom from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) in Seattle mentioned the foregoing in a paper published on the 22nd. NIH confirmed in the statement that because the researcher who submitted the data has the relevant rights to the data, it has the right to request deletion.

Only 13 sequences were rescued, intensifying the investigation of the epidemic source

The New York Times pointed out that after Bren discovered that the 24 gene sequence provided by Aisi Fu (transliteration), a scientist at Wuhan People’s Hospital, disappeared, through careful study of the file, he found that the deleted data and data parts can still be stored in the Google cloud. The stored papers were found, and thirteen sequences were restored. According to reports, deleting relevant information and data from the database will make it more difficult for scientists to find evidence, fearing to slow down the progress of research.

According to NIH, Fu Aisi’s request for deletion is that the gene sequence data has been updated and will be submitted to another database that does not provide a name. In order to “avoid confusion”, the hospital is requested to delete the data originally submitted.

Bren said that the request for deletion has made the outside world more suspicious of China’s transparency in tracing the source of the epidemic. This shows that one of the main reasons that we have not seen more of these sequences may be that someone did not really want to make them public. Ebright, a professor at Rutgers University in the United States, said that the move did not explain the root cause of the epidemic, and it is still impossible to determine whether it was a laboratory leak or from nature. But this provides the following evidence that China “deliberately confounded” the early incidents of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in the fall of 2019 with the investigation of these incidents.

The U.S. will hold a hearing

On the other hand, the Special Subcommittee to Investigate the Epidemic, established by the Republican Leader of the U.S. House of Representatives Kevin McCarthy and other congressmen, is scheduled to hold a hearing on the 29th and will invite several top scientists on various theories and opinions on the origin of the epidemic. testify. McCarthy stated that the relationship between the Wuhan Institute of Virology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the People’s Liberation Army will be the focus of his greatest concern.

A Chinese researcher asked the National Institutes of Health to delete the data submitted by him last year, including the viral gene sequences of hospitalized patients or suspected cases of Wuhan pneumonia collected in Wuhan from January to February last year. The picture shows an electron micrograph of apoptotic cells collected from a Wufei patient after being infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus.  (Reuters file photo)

A Chinese researcher asked the National Institutes of Health to delete the data submitted by him last year, including the viral gene sequences of hospitalized patients or suspected cases of Wuhan pneumonia collected in Wuhan from January to February last year. The picture shows an electron micrograph of apoptotic cells collected from a Wufei patient after being infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (Reuters file photo)



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